Essential electrical inspections and what you need to know​

All electrical installations deteriorate with time and use, and it is therefore essential for regular electrical inspections and reports to be conducted to determine if they meet current standards or if electrical maintenance is required. This is the case for both commercial and domestic property, and we have outlined the key things you need to know below:

What is an Electrical Installation Condition Report?

An Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR), formerly a periodic inspection report (PIP), is a formal document that is created following an assessment of the electrical installations within a property. This report outlines the condition of the installations, observations, and any safety issues or defects, and states if the installations comply with current regulations.

You may require an EICR for a number of reasons, including the end of the recommended period between inspections, buying or selling a property, or even determining the condition of installations after a fire or flood.

Based on the findings of the report, and the observations and recommendations provided, the customer is then required to source the work required.

Who requires an EICR?

It is a statutory requirement that all commercial properties and properties where the public has access are regularly tested and an EICR created. Although it is not a statutory requirement for domestic properties, it is widely advised that all properties go through this process.

How often should this be undertaken?

Intervals between inspections and EICRs are determined based upon the function and use of the property. We have outlined a few key intervals below:

Routine Check
Maximum period between inspections & testing

Commercial
1 year
5 years

Educational establishment
6 months
5 years

Hospitals
1 year
5 years

Industrial
1 year
3 years

Residential accommodation
At change of occupancy or 1 year
5 years

Shops
1 year
5 years

Leisure complexes
4 months
5 years

Restaurants/hotels
1 year
5 years

Petrol stations
1 year
1 year

Construction site installations
3 months
3 months

Domestic
1 year
Change of occupancy or 10 years

Who should perform an EICR?

An EICR should only be performed by a fully trained and qualified electrician, with the relevant experience in EICRs.

At Kore Solutions, we have an experienced team of professionals that regularly conduct electrical inspections, tests and deliver comprehensive EICRs for a diverse range of clients.

What is the process?

1. The electrician will conduct a visual inspection, noting things such as wear and tear, damage, incorrect installation, and so on
2. They will then perform tests to check that the installations meet current regulations
3. A report will then be produced providing the customer with details of the inspection, whether the installations are satisfactory or not, issues discovered, and the recommended steps to rectify the issues

EICR codes explained

Within the report, each observation will have a classification code assigned to it, including C1, C2, C3.

C1 means that danger is present, there is a risk of injury, and immediate action is required.

C2 means the installation is potentially dangerous, and urgent action should be taken.

C3 means that improvement is recommended.

For more information about periodic electrical inspections and testing, or EICRs in particular, please contact the Kore team by calling 01224 228952 or emailing info@kore-solutions.co.uk

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